Tuesday, 29 September 2009

Autumn 988 - Campaign Progress

And so it all kicks off. Treyine is upset at the wounding of Lord De La Warre, their favourite general, so they invade Tropilium, led by the fearless Sir Geoffrey. Hykar sees the chance of some easy pickings while the Treyine army is away and rides for Treyine as fast as they can. The Brethren decide that their recent regency in the Border Kingdoms entitles them to a bit more of the cake, so they invade. Meanwhile, Zog-Rot, seeing the Brethren distracted also chooses to invade the Border Kingdoms.

The rules do not cover what happens if multiple armies invade the same area. We decided to let the dice decide. 1d6 plus War Rating. Highest roller invades the nation first. After all, each turn is three months, which is more than enough time to march up and down a country. It all fell out as follows:

1. Treyine invades Tropilium
2. Hykar invades Treyine (the Treyine army will be footsore by now)
3 The Brethren invade the Border Kingdoms
4. Zog-Rot invades the Border Kingdoms

The situation at the start of Autumn 988:
Click image for a larger version


The armies for the Autumn turn are as at the start of the year, except for Treyine and Tropilium, whose remaining forces are detailed below:

Treyine Army
1 Foot Knight
9 Archers
The White Company
The Spear of Saint Lindorf
1 Heavy Spearmen (Tribute from the Brethren)
1 Knight (Tribute from Ekra)

Tropilium Army
1 Legionaries
Pherros (L1 Mage)

3 comments:

  1. So you're playing that an army can participate in multiple battles during a season?

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  2. Yes. A season is three months, which is a fair bit of time really and we don't envisage the nations being huge, so we agreed that an army could fight multiple battles in one season. It's a bit like Harold marching north to Stamford Bridge and then back down to Hastings and fighting at both places within a short space of time. This kind of rationalisation might become problematic if any nation becomes large enough to occupy most of the campaign map, though.

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  3. Maybe an army can fight two battles within adjoining provinces...

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